February 2010


“…Money breeds more money and develops a quality akin to matter – the larger the agglomerations, the greater their gravitational pull or, as the Bible puts it: “unto he that hath shall be rendered and from he that hath not shall be taken away, even that which he hath.”
Indeed, contrary to what they may tell you, the banks never really want their loans to be repaid at all. Just so long as the interest is funded it is in fact to their benefit for the capital to remain outstanding on their books as ‘assets’ and for the debts to be rolled over. Every time the IMF or World Bank extends a line of credit to some impoverished nation, are they being ‘charitable’ therefore or are they simply perpetuating the enslavement?

Second, such a system relies entirely, as do all Ponzi schemes, on the assumption of continued growth, hence its inherent instability. Once that growth is threatened the edifice collapses. Householders in Britain today will appreciate such a phenomenon – the result of ‘leverage’ – only too well: put up 10 per cent for a property and borrow the rest from the bank. That property’s value need rise by only 10 per cent and you have doubled your equity. But on the flip side that value need fall by only 10 percent and you are wiped out.
Which in turn explains precisely why a contraction of a mere 2 or 3 percent in the global economy leads not to a correspondingly minute fall on international stock markets, but to financial Armageddon.

Likewise with the banks – lend ten times more money than you possess and when the economy grows – or at least pretends to grow – Porsches galore, but when the lack of growth is exposed it requires only 11% of the loans on your books (in value terms) to be bad and you are bust. The truth is not that these institutions have suddenly become insolvent therefore, but that they were never really solvent in the first place since the assumptions on which they were founded could not apply in the real world. Simple false-accounting has meant that by rolling over their debts they have been able to keep them on their books as ‘assets’ rather than losses and forestall the evil hour.
There is an overarching name for the process I have outlined – ‘usury’ – and our predecessors from the Ancient and Medieval worlds appear to have appreciated much better than us its ultimate destination: ruin...”

Please click HERE to read the rest of this brilliant article.

…in a nutshell!!

“…Gold is inert. Lifeless. Incorruptible. But inherently shiftless. It never gets out of bed in the morning. It has never earned a penny in its entire life.

Gold won’t make you rich. It toils not; neither does it spin. Since it doesn’t hustle, it won’t increase your wealth. That’s why, in the Bible, the slave who kept his master’s wealth safe in gold got beaten. Gold won’t earn a profit. It won’t pay you a salary or give you a company car. All it will do is help keep you from getting poor. We’ve never heard of a man who had 100 ounces of gold who was poor. On the other hand, we’ve read about millions of people with stacks of paper money who couldn’t afford a cup of coffee. In our wallet, for example, is a 10 Trillion Dollar bill from Zimbabwe. A dear reader gave it to us. You could have a stack of those a foot high. You still wouldn’t be able to buy a latte at Starbucks. On the other hand, imagine you had a stack of Krugerrands or maple leafs. Well, you still couldn’t buy a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Because the dumb clerk wouldn’t know what it was. And if he did take the gold coin in exchange for coffee, he’d probably rush over to the mall where some sharp dealer offered to take it off his hands in exchange for PAPER MONEY!

You see, the average person has no idea what real money is. One dollar bill looks the same as another to him. And gold? He’s probably never seen gold, unless it was wrapped around his finger…”

 
To enjoy Bill Bonner‘s full article on investing and the wealth preservation aspect of owning gold please click HERE

In his latest market letter, Murray Pollitt of Pollitt & Co. in Toronto, the grand and not that old man of Canadian mine finance, remarks that the world’s policy makers lack the courage to accept the discipline necessary to shore up the world’s finances. So, Pollitt writes:
Our best guess is that markets, not policy makers, will determine the next monetary system. And, as much for lack of alternatives as the traditional reasons, gold will be somehow involved. Meanwhile markets will be characterized by volatility, defaults, lots of uncertainty, and a rush for the hard stuff. Before they get around to a monetary system, governments will wake up to the need for wealth creation and, since the quick fix for wealth creation is competitive devaluation, we expect governments to get at it with vigour. Shades of the 1930s.
Pollitt’s commentary is headlined “Farewell to All the Emperors” and he has generously consented to GATA’s posting it HERE
The Greek politico-economic predicament in a nutshell!
…an excellent article by young economist and aspiring libertarian Anita Acavalos.
This is a must read in order to understand the contemporary “Greek Tragedy“…
I predict a riot

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National Inflation Association just released a trailer for its next documentary, tentatively titled “The Second Wave“.